By John Steinbeck
Chapter 1 -

1. Look at the way both Lennie and George are first described. How is the intial description fitting when we find out more about each man?

            Lennie and George are both described in the first chapter as two men wearing denim clothing with black, shapeless hats. George was meantioned to be small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features. The way they describe George shows his more cunning side. These characteristics would be of one who is independant and intelligent, such as we find out in the future. Lennie was also meantioned as a huge man, shapeless of face, with large pale eyes, and with wide sloping shoulders. He walked more like a bear dragging his paws. These are signs of his fellowship; how hes a follower. He imitates George in almost everything he does to prove this and we see in the future of the story that he relies on George just as he follows him.

2. Is the relationship between George and Lennie one of friendship, or does George only feel obligates to take care of Lennie? What evidence can you find to support either conclusion?

             To reference the story; George would tell Lennie of how things would be in the future for them. It would make Lennie happy to hear it and not only did George do this as a kind gesture to Lennie; he cared for him. This is not just seemingly an obligation because you can see how George can somewhat be like a guardian to Lennie. He cares enough to keep him although his life would be better without him there. So with this evidence, a conclusion can be met about George and Lennie's friendship.

3.Why does Lennie have a dead mouse? Why does George take it away?

           From the beginning of the book you can tell there is something wrong with Lennie. In reference to the mice; Lennie liked to pet things. Sometimes the things he petted died; which was the usual case. George took this from him because it had been dead for awhile but to be specific; when Lennie petted things, nothing good ever happened. Lennie was too strong for his own good which was his downfall in the end.

4.What happened at the last place George and Lennie worked?

             The last place that George and Lennie worked was in Weed. Lennie had got in trouble with his compulsive need to feel things he liked. There was this girl in a red dress and Lennie wanted to feel the dress so he grabbed it and wouldn't let go. Naturally the women thought he was trying to rape her and let our a scream. Later when she escaped she got the whole city looking for them so they had to ditch town and find something else to do.

5.Describe the dream George and Lennie have for the future. Why is it so important to both men?

George and Lennie's dream for the future is to own a ranch with there own house and animals. They'd do work when they wanted and stay in when it rained outside. Lennie would tend the rabbits, like he always wanted to, while feeding them alfalfa and George would be able to kick out anyone he wanted; because it was their land and no one else's. It was so important to them because they knew that they had each other and to succeed in this goal would mean an end to all that threatened that.

Chapter 2-

1. How is the bunk house described? What does the description tell the reader about the men who live there?

       The bunk house was a large rectangle building. Inside the walls were whitewashes and the floor unpainted. In three walls there were small, square windows, and in the fourth, a solid door with a wooden latch. Against the walls were eight bunks,  five of them made up with blankets and the other three showing their burlap ticking. Over each bunk there was nailed an apple box with the opening forward so that it made two shelves for the personal belongings for the occupant of the bunk: This description shows that the men who live here were not men who needed large homes or lavish settings but men who thrived at hard labour and adapted well to their surroundings. The men who lived there did not need much more then that.

2.What do we find out about Curley, his wife, and his father through George's discussion with others?

          In George's discussion's with the men in the bunk house, he discovers the true nature of Curley , his wife, and his father.  He kearns that Curley only recently married the piece of jail bait that lurked the ranch. He was a fighter and liked to pick on larger men for having an advantage of size over him. Usually went one of two ways; either he won the fight and was praised or lost and people told the larger guy to pick on someone his own size. Not truelly fair. They say he kept a glove full of vasoline just for his wife.
           Curley's wife was jailbait and in George's discussions he discovered her mischevious nature towards men. She gave even Crooks the eye it seemed.
        When George first enters the ranch, he hears the deeds of the owner. He learns about his generousity but also his temper. It seemed he harassed the stable buck every time he was angry but on holidays was generous enough to give the employees a whole gallon of whiskey. This person seems to have two sides.

3. How would you describe Curley and his wife? What do their actions tell you about each of their characters?

         Together as a pair, I wouldn't imagine these two as a couple. It's obvious that Curley's wife is an unfaithful one and that Curley is the jealous type. These two things obviously don't mix and in the incident that she is stuck on a ranch full of men, the later result is an expected one.

4. Re-read Steinbeck's description of Slim (p.37). What does this description tell you about Slim's character? Is he a man to be trusted and looked up to?

          The description of Slim in Steinbeck's novel conveys Slim to be a man who really stands out. Not only is he a labourer, but he has grace and is good at it. This would be the man you'd take the words from and repeat to all who asked. He would be trusted and looked up to, just as he was, for his true majesty and cunning.

5. What is Lennie eagerly talking about on page 40?

         Like throughout the novel, Lennie always speaks eagerly of his obsession of rabbits and the plans they had for the future. You can tell in the section that it's almost like a fairytale story to him; one spoke to him before going to sleep every night. With his child-like nature this is very possible.

Chapter 3-

1. What are Carlson's reasons for shooting Candy's dog?

       Carlson's reasons for putting down Candy's dog were simple; he was too old to eat solid food, he was blind, and he stunk up the place anywhere he went so that it wouldn't go away for days. The dog was suffering and all Carlson wanted to do was end his strange existence there and then.

2. What are Candy's reasons for not shooting the dog?

        Candy's defense for not shooting his dog was all about the past. He had that dog since it was a pup and watched how it's talents were used to herd sheep. It was a great dog back then but times had changed. So in the end Candy let Carlson take his dog, knowing no other reason to prolong his life.

3. In what ways is Candy like his dog?

          Though candy did not like it, he was becoming useless too. With his old age and disability he feared that he would soon get the boot out of the ranch, just as his dog's life ended on account of his annoyances.

4. What does the fight between Lennie and Curley show about their characters?

         The fight inside the bunk house between Lennie and Curley shows the true extent of their characters. For Lennie, it showed his brute strenght and his lack of control over it. He would only listen to George and meant no harm because hes not a violent person. On the other hand, Curley is one who starts fights. He didn't have anything against Lennie but his size. In this way, they're both oposites in their nature.

5. Why doesn't George help Lennie in his fight?

      George doesn't help Lennie in his fight because he knows very well that Lennie can handle himself if told to.

Chapter 4-

1. What does Crooks' room and his things in it tell you about his character?

       Inside Crooks' room there are books, medicines, and many tools for his various jobs on the ranch. To describe his character from these misc objects; I would say hes an educated person forced to work as a labourer because of his skin. This has made him very bitter from the unfair conditions hes in. Crooks gets lonely in his seperate room and this furthers his character of a bitter and vengeful African American.

2. What does Crooks say to Lennie about loneliness?

       Crooks states to Lennie his problems as he know that he had no chance to understand them. He tells him that being alone on the ranch was one thing, for he had no one visiting him at night and no one to speak to, but also there was not another colored family for a long ways. He describes his loneliness, "... Maybe if he sees somethin', he don't know whether it's right or wrong. he can't turn to some other guy and ast' if he sees it too..."

3. Why would Crooks react so negatively to Lennie, then let him in anyway?

        Though Crooks resents Lennie for his skin color and lack of intelligence, he lets him in anyway because he has no one else for company.

4. Why does Crooks torture and taunt Lennie about George?

         Crooks tortures and taunts Lennie about George out of envy. He wishes to see Lennie put in his place; to feel his loneliness instead of the warmth of companionship. he knows he won't be making anything better this way, but to have someone like himself is almost a dream of sorts.

5. Why is Crooks called "Crooks"? How does this reflect his personality?

          Crooks gets his name from the injury of his spine. He looks crooked and disfigured which is the orgin of his nickname. This reflects his personality such in a way of the sterotypical hunched persona; a bitter man whose life's intent is figured and only thought of. In this case it would be Crooks' loneliness and a way to overcom this even with his negitive attitiude.

Chapter 5-

1. How have Curley's wife's dreams for her life changed or been lost?

       Curley's wife had a lot of chances to do something with her life. Chances at fame and fortune as described by her. The only thing standing in he way was family; her mother in specific. Her mother kept her from leaving and acquiring her dream so instead she married to get away from them. These are large changes that her life went through all the way up to her time of death.

2. Why does Curley's wife tell Lennie about "the letter"? What do you think the letter symbolizes?

          Curley's wife told Lennie about this chance she got to be in a movie. This guy she met at Riverside Dance Palace told her she was a natural and that she'd get a letter from him when he went back to Hollywood. She never did get that letter and assumed that her mother stole it. In the story I believe the letter symbolized her mischance. To tell of her opportunites wasted

3. How does Lennie's killing of the puppy parallel his killing of Curley's wife and the mice?

      The killing of Lennie's pup is like foreshadowing to a next large misfortune. It would symbolize that soon all things would fall apart and the story was taking a turn for the worst.

4. How does Candy react to the death of Curley's wife?

      When Candy spots the dead body his heart sinks in the knowledge that the short lived dream died so early. There would be no chance now of the relaxed future as promised.

5. What options do George and Candy discuss after discovery of the body?

        George and Candy discuss what has to be done with Lennie when they discover the body of Curley's wife. George hopes that with some chance that Lennie may only be locked away for his crime but Candy knows better. When Curley saw this he knew for sure that Lennie was a deadman.

Chapter 6-

1. What is the significance of the rabbit appearing at the end of the book? 

      The rabbit at the end of the book signifies Lennie's wrong doing and the consequences. Tending to the rabbits was his prize for not screwing things up but in the end the guilt was getting to his head. The thing he longed for most had turned against him and marked the end of Lennie.

2. Why did George kill Lennie and was he justified in doing that?

         George killed Lennie because he couldn't let anyone else do it. Like Candy's dog; Lennie was George's responsibility and theres was no way in hell he'd let some other cold hearted person do it. Lennie was saved a harsh death in this by being taken out by the peson who loved him most.

3. Explain what happens to the dream at the end of the novel for both Lennie and George.

        The dream was built by the companionship of bother Lennie and George. When Lennie died; so did the dream.

4. In what way does Slim show understanding for George's decision? Why does Carlson ask the last question?

          Slim's sympathy is grand and he shows his understanding through his apathy. He told George the truth; he had to do it. The last question was stated by Carlson to make a remark at a small theme in the book: The ear of a stranger. Its to show the loneliness in emphasis in the novel and how most people rely on the listening of strangers to compensate.

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Comments

05/17/2013 6:52pm

This is a good site for resources

Reply
Andrea
09/25/2013 5:30pm

thanx this is really helpful

Reply
Lea
12/01/2013 1:26am

I think you mean "empathy" in the last paragraph. "Apathy" would mean that Slim did not care.

These answers don't show a very deep understanding of the book, and there are a lot of typos and grammatical errors (not so good if you were to hand in for English class) but the range of perspectives did help me with my own answers. So, thank you.

Reply
joana
01/05/2014 6:59am

It helped me, but it is very unclear and doesnt make sense. Especially the chapter 4 section. e.g 'In this case it would be Crooks' loneliness and a way to overcom this even with his negitive attitiude.' ?????

Reply
Spank
04/03/2014 10:13pm

I'm with joana

Reply
taralynn
04/03/2014 11:16pm

I cried when gorege had to kill lennie :,(

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